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Large payout to migrants

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mommy2devin
2 Boys, I need calgon!

Member since 10/07

1572 total posts

Name:
Shannon

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by mommy2devin

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by NervousNell

Posted by Raging2020

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Sorry…..you crossed illegally. You are entitled to NOTHING.



Yep. So if I break into your house and fall down your stairs and break my neck while illegally trespassing in your home, should I be able to sue you for my injuries?
Such fuking nonsense.



But, but, but...no more mean tweets from the orange man. Don’t you feel better now?

Where are all the Biden voters now on this site? Chat Icon



Still here, just not taking the bait.



I wouldn’t either as it is quite embarrassing.



PFFFTTTTTT, that doesn't even make sense? Embarrassing for what? Letting you bait and incite drama threads? THAT would be embarrasshing.. hence why nobody is going to bite for you anymore. But you still try... A for effort I guess.

Posted 11/3/21 12:40 PM
 

KarenK122
The Journey is the Destination

Member since 5/05

4405 total posts

Name:
Karen

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Suing for what? That you crossed illegally putting your own family in danger. They are entitled to nothing. It was their own actions that caused the consequence. This country needs to start taking care of its own, veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill, before it starts doling money out on bogus lawsuits for people who are not citizens and did not try to enter the country lawfully. Any lawyer who takes this on should be disbarred.

Posted 11/3/21 1:17 PM
 

windyweather21
LIF Adult

Member since 3/21

6623 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by KarenK122

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Suing for what? That you crossed illegally putting your own family in danger. They are entitled to nothing. It was their own actions that caused the consequence. This country needs to start taking care of its own, veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill, before it starts doling money out on bogus lawsuits for people who are not citizens and did not try to enter the country lawfully. Any lawyer who takes this on should be disbarred.




We had someone who was standing up for things but he said politically incorrect things that made people cry. Now we have a mess and some ARE fighting as look all around to all the Republicans that won yesterday.

Posted 11/3/21 1:25 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by mommy2devin

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by mommy2devin

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by NervousNell

Posted by Raging2020

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Sorry…..you crossed illegally. You are entitled to NOTHING.



Yep. So if I break into your house and fall down your stairs and break my neck while illegally trespassing in your home, should I be able to sue you for my injuries?
Such fuking nonsense.



But, but, but...no more mean tweets from the orange man. Don’t you feel better now?

Where are all the Biden voters now on this site? Chat Icon



Still here, just not taking the bait.



I wouldn’t either as it is quite embarrassing.



PFFFTTTTTT, that doesn't even make sense? Embarrassing for what? Letting you bait and incite drama threads? THAT would be embarrasshing.. hence why nobody is going to bite for you anymore. But you still try... A for effort I guess.



Notice how she completely ignored my post in response to her question about where the Biden voters were?
She had to resort right back to insults and incorrect information.

Posted 11/3/21 1:35 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by KarenK122

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Suing for what? That you crossed illegally putting your own family in danger. They are entitled to nothing. It was their own actions that caused the consequence. This country needs to start taking care of its own, veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill, before it starts doling money out on bogus lawsuits for people who are not citizens and did not try to enter the country lawfully. Any lawyer who takes this on should be disbarred.



Seeking asylum is NOT ILLEGAL!
What about taking care of the veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill? Why give corporation billions of dollars worth of tax benefits when those taxes could have gone towards these social problems? Why are the Republicans and some Democrats grandstanding the Social Safety net bill now in Congress?

Posted 11/3/21 1:40 PM
 

MrsWoods
LIF Adult

Member since 4/12

1419 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by KarenK122

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Suing for what? That you crossed illegally putting your own family in danger. They are entitled to nothing. It was their own actions that caused the consequence. This country needs to start taking care of its own, veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill, before it starts doling money out on bogus lawsuits for people who are not citizens and did not try to enter the country lawfully. Any lawyer who takes this on should be disbarred.



I agree with all of this.

Posted 11/3/21 2:13 PM
 

mommy2devin
2 Boys, I need calgon!

Member since 10/07

1572 total posts

Name:
Shannon

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by mommy2devin

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by mommy2devin

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by NervousNell

Posted by Raging2020

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Sorry…..you crossed illegally. You are entitled to NOTHING.



Yep. So if I break into your house and fall down your stairs and break my neck while illegally trespassing in your home, should I be able to sue you for my injuries?
Such fuking nonsense.



But, but, but...no more mean tweets from the orange man. Don’t you feel better now?

Where are all the Biden voters now on this site? Chat Icon



Still here, just not taking the bait.



I wouldn’t either as it is quite embarrassing.



PFFFTTTTTT, that doesn't even make sense? Embarrassing for what? Letting you bait and incite drama threads? THAT would be embarrasshing.. hence why nobody is going to bite for you anymore. But you still try... A for effort I guess.



Notice how she completely ignored my post in response to her question about where the Biden voters were?
She had to resort right back to insults and incorrect information.



Yep, typical. Just looking for the drama. Same way she was sure to bump all the threads the other day that were drama filled to make sure they ended back on page 1 front and center. Drama.

Posted 11/3/21 2:41 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by mommy2devin


Yep, typical. Just looking for the drama. Same way she was sure to bump all the threads the other day that were drama filled to make sure they ended back on page 1 front and center. Drama.



If it's not rhetoric or passive aggressive...it don't land.

Posted 11/3/21 3:04 PM
 

KarenK122
The Journey is the Destination

Member since 5/05

4405 total posts

Name:
Karen

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by KarenK122

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Suing for what? That you crossed illegally putting your own family in danger. They are entitled to nothing. It was their own actions that caused the consequence. This country needs to start taking care of its own, veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill, before it starts doling money out on bogus lawsuits for people who are not citizens and did not try to enter the country lawfully. Any lawyer who takes this on should be disbarred.



Seeking asylum is NOT ILLEGAL!
What about taking care of the veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill? Why give corporation billions of dollars worth of tax benefits when those taxes could have gone towards these social problems? Why are the Republicans and some Democrats grandstanding the Social Safety net bill now in Congress?



There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.

Posted 11/3/21 3:17 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by KarenK122

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by KarenK122

Posted by mxoxom2004

It is a proposal to settle the lawsuits filed against the US for seperating parents and children at the border.

From the WSJ

WASHINGTON—Eleven Republican senators on Monday asked President Biden to halt his administration's talks to settle lawsuits filed on behalf of immigrant families who say they suffered trauma from being separated after illegally crossing the southern border during the Trump administration.

"[R]ewarding illegal immigration with financial payments runs counter to our laws and would only serve to encourage more lawlessness at our border," Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley and the 10 other Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to Mr. Biden. "To that end, I ask that your administration refuse to issue any settlement payments for aliens who broke our laws."

Earlier on Monday Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also sharply criticized the potential settlements of around $450,000 a person , which The Wall Street Journal reported last week.

"Honestly, this absurd idea feels like a satirical policy proposal that Republicans would have invented to make a parody out of the radical left," Mr. McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, previewing a likely line of attack in next year's midterm election.

The White House referred a request for comment to the Justice Department, which didn't immediately respond.

The Journal reported that the Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services departments are considering payments that could amount to close to $1 million a family to resolve lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who say the government subjected them to lasting psychological trauma .

People familiar with the matter have said the final numbers could shift and that many families would likely get smaller amounts, depending on their circumstances, but the total potential payout could amount to $1 billion or more. About 940 claims have been filed so far by families that were separated, and government officials aren't sure how many more will come forward or prove eligible under the potential settlement.

By pursuing a settlement, the government is seeking to avoid trials that lawyers experienced with large-scale cases involving alleged emotional distress say could be even costlier.

Mr. McConnell has been using his floor remarks to hit themes that Republicans expect will be issues in the 2022 elections. His speech Monday marked his first extended comments on the topic of possible payments to families separated at the border. Senate Republican hopefuls have been focusing on immigration , viewing it as an issue that could swing voters their way next year.

Democrats expressed mixed views about the proposed settlement. Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva welcomed it as one way to address the wrongs of the Trump era, but said it wasn't enough. "It deals with that individual, the rights that were violated and the process that was violated there," he said. "Yes, and the agony for those families on a family per family basis. It's the overall policy that needs more work."

Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona, considered one of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats, said while he was still seeking details, "I do have concerns. It's a lot of families, and a lot of money."

As part of the Republican Trump administration's so-called zero-tolerance enforcement policy, immigration agents separated thousands of children , ranging from infants to teenagers, from their parents at the southern border in 2018 after they had crossed illegally from Mexico to seek asylum in the U.S.

In some cases, families were forcefully broken up with no provisions to track and later reunite them, government investigations found. The lawsuits allege some of the children suffered from a range of ailments, including heat exhaustion and malnutrition, and were kept in freezing cold rooms and provided little medical attention.

A January report from the Justice Department's inspector general faulted senior Trump Justice Department officials for knowing the policy change would result in families being separated, but pressing ahead without preparing for it.

Several of the families started filing lawsuits seeking compensation under the Federal Tort Claims Act in 2019 and 2020, and some of the legal decisions have since gone in favor of the families. In March 2020, for example, a federal judge in Arizona denied the Justice Department's bid to dismiss one of the earliest such lawsuits, rejecting the government's argument that it had been authorized by regulation and statute to proceed with its prosecution and detention strategy of the immigrant families.

"The United States has cited to no statute explicitly authorizing the government to detain parents and children in separate facilities before it has charged either with a crime. Indeed, no such statute exists," U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton wrote.

In March 2021, lawyers for the families in that case asked the court to force the Justice Department to turn over documents that its inspector general had compiled in the investigation of the separation policy. The Justice Department had argued some of the documents couldn't be turned over because of legal privileges or other grounds. Weeks later, lawyers for the government and the families told the court they had had initial discussions about a possible settlement, according to court filings.

By seeking to settle the cases, legal experts said, the U.S. government is avoiding a series of potentially protracted trials before unpredictable judges and juries and no obvious comparisons to draw from for the allegations of harm.

In order to calculate a potential payout, child psychologists and other medical experts would be called upon to describe the potential impact of the separation and determine what the cost of therapy might be for each child over the course of decades, legal experts said.

"These can be extremely expensive cases. It's not just the difficulty in estimating the emotional trauma and what that means, it's the idea that something would be carried over so many years," said Adam Zimmerman, who was deputy special master of the 9/11 victim compensation fund and is a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. "We're talking about kids who might be living with this for a very long time."

When Michigan state officials took to trial in the late 2000s some cases of female prisoners alleging a pattern of sexual abuse in the state's prisons, to determine the possible amount of damages that could be awarded to a pool of hundreds of women making similar claims, they were surprised at how large the jury awards were, said Margo Schlanger, who ran the civil-rights office during the Obama administration at the Department of Homeland Security and now teaches at the University of Michigan law school. After juries awarded millions of dollars to the women, the larger group of women entered into a $100 million settlement with the state in 2009.

Highlighting the potential political impact of a possible settlement over the separated families, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House Republicans' campaign arm, said in a post last week: "It would be interesting to know how vulnerable House Democrats feel about Joe Biden's plan."

In a poll released last week, the NRCC found that border security ranked second only to jobs and the economy as the top concern for voters. Its poll, conducted from Oct. 16-21, showed that Republicans had a 27-point advantage on the question of which party could best handle the topic of border security, with 54% saying Republicans would do a better job compared with 27% favoring Democrats. That compared with a 10-point advantage held by Republicans in early July.

Other Republicans said they would try to block the payments, though it isn't clear how they could, as such settlements don't require congressional approval. Montana Sen. Steve Daines on Friday said he was drafting an amendment to the coming defense policy bill that would prevent the government from compensating separated families, a move unlikely to gain traction with Democrats in control of Congress.



Suing for what? That you crossed illegally putting your own family in danger. They are entitled to nothing. It was their own actions that caused the consequence. This country needs to start taking care of its own, veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill, before it starts doling money out on bogus lawsuits for people who are not citizens and did not try to enter the country lawfully. Any lawyer who takes this on should be disbarred.



Seeking asylum is NOT ILLEGAL!
What about taking care of the veterans, disabled, homeless, mentally ill? Why give corporation billions of dollars worth of tax benefits when those taxes could have gone towards these social problems? Why are the Republicans and some Democrats grandstanding the Social Safety net bill now in Congress?



There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.



I'm not deflecting. The Jobs Act gave corporations billions in tax savings at the determent of average US citizens like myself.

The amount of tax revenue lost to the corp. tax cut could have funded the programs that you believe are not in peril because the US wants to settle out of court pending lawsuits instead of going to court and getting a precedent as a settlement. And it's NOT billions to non citizens...it's estimated cost is 1 billion. Do you know what % 1 billion is of the estimated $233 billion CBO estimates is the lost of tax revenue from Corps because of the Jobs Act? And it never did trickle down...Business investment declined...factories close and there were mass layoffs.

It's not deflect...more a view of the bigger picture and it's not the 1 billion dollars to children illegally separated from their parents at the border seeking asylum. If that makes you mad...why aren't you upset with the BILLIONS of dollars given as a tax cut that allowed the rich and powerful to get even more rick and powerful. They throw this crap out there to deflect you from the bigger picture where IRS code is overhauled to benefit that 1% while taking more money from your hard earned income.


Get mad about the corp. tax cuts while you get SALT.

Message edited 11/3/2021 3:55:48 PM.

Posted 11/3/21 3:38 PM
 

Diane
Hope is Contagious....catch it

Member since 5/05

30626 total posts

Name:
D

Re: Large payout to migrants

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.





Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are looking to give them $450,000? I might as well give my house away.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?

Message edited 11/3/2021 4:09:50 PM.

Posted 11/3/21 4:01 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?


What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?

Posted 11/3/21 4:16 PM
 

windyweather21
LIF Adult

Member since 3/21

6623 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?



What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?


Do you plan to house and feed and educate a family or two? Sounds like you are very empathetic and want to help as much as you can. Let us know how that works out for you.

Posted 11/3/21 4:45 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?



What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?



Do you plan to house and feed and educate a family or two? Sounds like you are very empathetic and want to help as much as you can. Let us know how that works out for you.


I already do.

ETA: and again, you can't have any real debate back and forth. You just want to stoke fires and get your kicks from rhetics.

Message edited 11/3/2021 4:53:44 PM.

Posted 11/3/21 4:51 PM
 

windyweather21
LIF Adult

Member since 3/21

6623 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?



What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?



Do you plan to house and feed and educate a family or two? Sounds like you are very empathetic and want to help as much as you can. Let us know how that works out for you.



I already do.

ETA: and again, you can't have any real debate back and forth. You just want to stoke fires and get your kicks from rhetics.




So you have illegal people living in your home that came in the wrong way to this country?

Posted 11/3/21 5:21 PM
 

mommy2devin
2 Boys, I need calgon!

Member since 10/07

1572 total posts

Name:
Shannon

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?



What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?



Do you plan to house and feed and educate a family or two? Sounds like you are very empathetic and want to help as much as you can. Let us know how that works out for you.



I already do.

ETA: and again, you can't have any real debate back and forth. You just want to stoke fires and get your kicks from rhetics.




So you have illegal people living in your home that came in the wrong way to this country?


You asked her if she planned to house and feed and educate a family or two. She said she did. Move on and answer the questions.

Posted 11/3/21 6:45 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?



What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?



Do you plan to house and feed and educate a family or two? Sounds like you are very empathetic and want to help as much as you can. Let us know how that works out for you.



I already do.

ETA: and again, you can't have any real debate back and forth. You just want to stoke fires and get your kicks from rhetics.




So you have illegal people living in your home that came in the wrong way to this country?


I answered your question. Would you like my census answers too? Itemized monthly budget?

Why not answer one of my older questions that you disregarded...what other screennames have you posted under on this website?

Also, my grandparents came to this country the "wrong" way escaping Nazi Germany. My grandfather served this country as well as one of those naughty illegals. Would you like to go to Pinelawn and dig up his grave to ship back to Germany?

Posted 11/3/21 7:30 PM
 

KarenK122
The Journey is the Destination

Member since 5/05

4405 total posts

Name:
Karen

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by Diane

[QUO

There are legal ways and legal entry points to seek asylum.

Do not deflect the topic. We are not talking about tax benefits, we are talking about giving billions of dollars to non citizens for something they did illegally.






Totally agree. I think THEY are drinking the Kool AidChat Icon
I cant believe anyone thinks this is ok.

They are entering from all borders, they are not seeking asylum. I thought Claiming Asylum in the United States, means you have to enter at a Port of Entry ?
You have 1 year to seek asylum? Will they be doing this?



What Kool Aid am I drinking?

Do you know what entering the US is at a non port of entry? It's a misdemeanor; a minor wrongdoing.
What do you really think life is like for these parents coming to the border with children is like in their home country? It's obviously more dangerous then the trek itself from their home country to the border or why would they leave what may be the only place they have ever known...family...material possessions...a language they can speak and understand...to cross Mexico ih hope of a better life?

Also, El Paso,IS A PORT OF ENTRY...as is San Diego ...areas where the children were separated from their families.

Legal issues aside...where is the empathy for these families?



Do you plan to house and feed and educate a family or two? Sounds like you are very empathetic and want to help as much as you can. Let us know how that works out for you.



I already do.

ETA: and again, you can't have any real debate back and forth. You just want to stoke fires and get your kicks from rhetics.




So you have illegal people living in your home that came in the wrong way to this country?



I answered your question. Would you like my census answers too? Itemized monthly budget?

Why not answer one of my older questions that you disregarded...what other screennames have you posted under on this website?

Also, my grandparents came to this country the "wrong" way escaping Nazi Germany. My grandfather served this country as well as one of those naughty illegals. Would you like to go to Pinelawn and dig up his grave to ship back to Germany?


Thanks to your grandfather for his time in the service.

If he served then he must have had a green card or would have been a citizen. If he was a child when he arrived, they waived some of those criteria. Children are different as I said in a previous thread. I do not want to blame or condemn any child for the decisions of the parent. Those who came over during the war, were refugees and I'm am sure came through one of the legal points of entry. My great grandparents also came over as immigrants but came through Ellis Island and were documented.

There is a difference in your comparisons and thousands of people coming through illegally, is not the same as those fleeing from a world war. If you don't agree, then we will just agree to disagree.

Posted 11/3/21 7:52 PM
 

Diane
Hope is Contagious....catch it

Member since 5/05

30626 total posts

Name:
D

Re: Large payout to migrants

Cookiepus, There is NO comparison between the 2.

Exactly what Karen said.

Posted 11/3/21 7:59 PM
 

windyweather21
LIF Adult

Member since 3/21

6623 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by Diane

Cookiepus, There is NO comparison between the 2.

Exactly what Karen said.



Exactly and I would love to know who these people are besides her kids and husband she lives with that she would take in illegally.

Posted 11/3/21 8:16 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

The Nazis came to power in from 1919 all the way up to the start of WW II in 1939.

You both have assumed that I am referring to the time period after the war began but I never said that.

Additionally, I did not share the journey to the US with you other then to say that my grandparents did not come "legally"

Do you think that the US in the throws of the Great Depression and immigration quotas that limited the amount of immigrants was welcoming German refugees with arms wide open? No, the immigrants would take the jobs and the food...sounds familiar, doesn't it. Did you know that the US actively tried to move the refugees to Latin America?

I don't see how their escape from persecution and possible death is any different then the migrants coming from the corrupt, gang ridden countries of Central America.

Persecution is persecution. And seeking asylum as a refugee is that same whether it was in the beginning of the last century or this century.

Posted 11/3/21 8:23 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by Diane

Cookiepus, There is NO comparison between the 2.

Exactly what Karen said.



Exactly and I would love to know who these people are besides her kids and husband she lives with that she would take in illegally.



Still won't answer my question but you pose another ridiculous follow up question.

Would you like to come visit my home?

Posted 11/3/21 8:26 PM
 

windyweather21
LIF Adult

Member since 3/21

6623 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by Diane

Cookiepus, There is NO comparison between the 2.

Exactly what Karen said.



Exactly and I would love to know who these people are besides her kids and husband she lives with that she would take in illegally.



Still won't answer my question but you pose another ridiculous follow up question.

Would you like to come visit my home?



Is this an invite? Chat Icon

Posted 11/3/21 8:49 PM
 

MrsWoods
LIF Adult

Member since 4/12

1419 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by CookiePuss

The Nazis came to power in from 1919 all the way up to the start of WW II in 1939.

You both have assumed that I am referring to the time period after the war began but I never said that.

Additionally, I did not share the journey to the US with you other then to say that my grandparents did not come "legally"

Do you think that the US in the throws of the Great Depression and immigration quotas that limited the amount of immigrants was welcoming German refugees with arms wide open? No, the immigrants would take the jobs and the food...sounds familiar, doesn't it. Did you know that the US actively tried to move the refugees to Latin America?

I don't see how their escape from persecution and possible death is any different then the migrants coming from the corrupt, gang ridden countries of Central America.

Persecution is persecution. And seeking asylum as a refugee is that same whether it was in the beginning of the last century or this century.



Migrants from Central America come here because they know they get hand outs and it aint only good people who are coming over either. Turn on the Spanish news or talk to someone from that country.

They come here and everything is free for them. Men and women work off the books and send money back to their country. A majority of women will come here pregnant or find some dumb guy to get them pregnant here or marry so they can stay with no issues and then get additional free stuff.

And lets not even begin about what the really bad people come to do. Its definitely to make a living just not what you would think.

So no its not the same.

Posted 11/3/21 9:01 PM
 

CookiePuss
Cake from Outer Space!

Member since 5/05

13986 total posts

Name:

Re: Large payout to migrants

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by CookiePuss

Posted by windyweather21

Posted by Diane

Cookiepus, There is NO comparison between the 2.

Exactly what Karen said.



Exactly and I would love to know who these people are besides her kids and husband she lives with that she would take in illegally.



Still won't answer my question but you pose another ridiculous follow up question.

Would you like to come visit my home?



Is this an invite? Chat Icon

. Answer my question about your previous screennames and. I will be happy to continue answering yours

Posted 11/4/21 6:50 AM
 
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