LIFamilies.com - Long Island, NY


RSS
Articles Business Directory Blog Real Estate Community Forum Shop My Family Contests

Log In Chat Index Search Rules Lingo Create Account

Quick navigation:   

Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted By Message
Pages: 1 [2]

chilltocam
LIF Adult

Member since 11/11

8020 total posts

Name:

Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Thanks everyone. I do get that it could be a lot for a teacher to do, but it's hard watching my nephew struggle and fail. And the good news is that my SIL was going to contact the school to set up a meeting to request additional services, but when she called, the school was already in the process of setting up another meeting and was about to contact her because they did had realized he was really struggling - so hopefully he will get some additional help and be able to do better in school

Posted 11/10/15 10:20 AM
 

BriBri2u
L'amore vince sempre

Member since 5/05

9320 total posts

Name:
Mrs. B

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by BargainMama

Posted by lakadema

I teach eighth grade math. I have to say this is unreasonable. The child is going to high school next year. I don't think I would honor this request as a teacher either for the following reason: if I happen to forget(amongst teaching my 100 students) to write down his hw for him or email you, is it then my fault he didn't do the hw? It's a slippery slope. I'm sure he has friends he can text in the teachers class and they can tell him the hw if he can't write it down himself. Also, an accommodation made for one child is not fair if I don't do it for everyone. I have plenty of students with ieps and 504s and they all manage to write down the hw everyday.



You don't have 100 students in ONE period though.

I'm saddened by some of these responses. If a kid needs help, they need HELP. Who cares if it's 1st grade, 8th grade, or 12th grade. Who cares if your 35 others students with an IEP don't need help writing it down? If ONE does, why deny that help?

Yes a child SHOULD be able to do that, but not ALL can (my son is in 11th and CAN'T). How about do everything you can to HELP make the child successful. If ALL of the other teachers are doing this for the child, they are obviously making it work. Why can't the one teacher do it? Just to be difficult. Sad.



I agree with this.

Chat Icon Chat Icon Chat Icon

Posted 11/11/15 2:43 PM
 

TheDivineMrsM
2 girls 4 me!

Member since 8/08

7878 total posts

Name:
Mama mama mama....

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

I think it's too much to ask of a teacher. If he's in a self-contained class, the teacher is dealing with a lot of different issues all at once: kids being pulled out for OT, PT, reading help. There are aides and scribes and co-teachers. And the lessons still have to go on... If he's in a general education class, the teacher could have 30 students in that class alone. And no matter what, getting your nephew used to this routine is a long-term disservice because at the hs level, students are expected to take some responsibility.

His IEP may need to be adjusted. Perhaps an aide/scribe can help ensure that the assignments are copied correctly into his notebook or planner. I don't know what his specific situation is, but PM me and I'll help you come up with some ideas. (I'm a HS guidance counselor).

I've also had some success with daily progress reports for my students. It's a check off sheet that students take from class to class. Teachers note whether hw was completed, in-class participation and behavior was ok, and whether hw was assigned for that night. The child takes it home, gets it signed by a parent, brings it to their counselor the next morning, and the counselor gives them a new one. Rinse and repeat until the student develops better habits.

Posted 11/11/15 4:33 PM
 

alexb
LIF Adult

Member since 5/13

960 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by chilltocam

Posted by LSP2005

Does he have an iep? I would schedule a meeting with the guidance counselor or the vice principal to discuss how he is slipping through the cracks.



Yes he has an iep and the principal was at the meeting where the teacher refused to provide the assignments. They will be seeking further assistance, but it just seems ridiculous that the teacher, who knows he has problems, would refuse to help in a way that seems (at least to me - so maybe from a teacher's perspective there's more to it), a relatively minor way.



My mom was a former principal of a K-8th school and i told her about your post. She said she would be mortified if any of her teachers did not do what was in the best interest of the student. If that means going above and beyond, then thats what she feels any of her teachers are expected to do. Sure teachers are bogged down but to have a teacher being aware of a student who is struggling and NOT doing everything in their power to help that student, well that would be a huge problem for her.

Posted 11/12/15 10:24 AM
 

BriBri2u
L'amore vince sempre

Member since 5/05

9320 total posts

Name:
Mrs. B

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by alexb

Posted by chilltocam

Posted by LSP2005

Does he have an iep? I would schedule a meeting with the guidance counselor or the vice principal to discuss how he is slipping through the cracks.



Yes he has an iep and the principal was at the meeting where the teacher refused to provide the assignments. They will be seeking further assistance, but it just seems ridiculous that the teacher, who knows he has problems, would refuse to help in a way that seems (at least to me - so maybe from a teacher's perspective there's more to it), a relatively minor way.



My mom was a former principal of a K-8th school and i told her about your post. She said she would be mortified if any of her teachers did not do what was in the best interest of the student. If that means going above and beyond, then thats what she feels any of her teachers are expected to do. Sure teachers are bogged down but to have a teacher being aware of a student who is struggling and NOT doing everything in their power to help that student, well that would be a huge problem for her.



Exactly, how can a teacher see a child struggling right in front of their eyes and NOT try and help? I consider that part of their job along with the parent.

Posted 11/12/15 11:53 AM
 

dpli
Daylight savings :)

Member since 5/05

13973 total posts

Name:
D

Is this asking too much of a teacher?

An IEP is an INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan. It doesn't matter how many students there are, it doesn't matter what other kids can or can't do and it doesn't matter what a teacher thinks a kid at that grade level "should" be able to do. If there is an accommodation listed in the IEP, the school is required BY LAW to honor the IEP. If the teacher can't manage it, it's on the school to figure out if he needs a 1:1 or some other means to have his needs met. If it's not on his IEP, and he is not able to do this on his own, it should be added to his IEP.

Believe me when I tell you that accommodations are not given easily and that there are underlying needs if a kid has an IEP. I would be questioning why this is only a problem for ONE teacher.

Posted 11/12/15 2:40 PM
 

MrsProfessor
hi

Member since 5/05

14279 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Since email is an option I would say it's not a big deal, especially if it becomes an IEP item. I used to have to hand write the homework for a student in his agenda each day- that was a lot because the class was not well behaved- but I don't see that email's a big deal since it would likely involve copying and pasting. A daily note, though, I can see being involved because you'd have to remember to give it to the child and then the child would have to make sure it was in a safe spot (this I also know from experience, I'd write the above student's homework out but there was no guarantee it was getting home.)

Posted 11/12/15 4:44 PM
 

LSP2005
Bunny kisses are so cute!

Member since 5/05

18612 total posts

Name:
L

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

I've been thinking about your post. What if your nephew and the class had to write down the homework assignment and the teacher has to initial it to say he wrote it properly.

Posted 11/12/15 9:11 PM
 

StarsStripes
LIF Adult

Member since 12/12

1192 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by Aries14

to be honest - I do think its a lot to ask just because those teachers can have 100+ students. If they started doing this for every kid whose parent just asked - it would be a nightmare. And they probably can't do for one and then have another parent ask and say No to them. I also tend to agree that at 8th grade it is the students responsibilty and even though your family is legit trying to help him - a lot of other parents will then turn it back on the teacher and blame them for missed homeworks or assignments. So unless there is a written reason on file at the school that the teacher is directed to do it - I would never expect them to take it on.



Exactly this. There is no way a teacher is going to remember to email/write down an assignment for a child everyday. If he has an IEP that should be the job of the resource room teacher if e has one. While I do think the teacher should have an eboard to post assignments, if it isn't required there isn't much to be done. I do suggest having your nephew write down the assignment on his own and having the teacher sign it at the end of every class. He has to be responsible for that though. I know it is a difficult situation, but this is the year he must learn responsibility before high school.

Posted 11/12/15 10:00 PM
 

StarsStripes
LIF Adult

Member since 12/12

1192 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by dpli

An IEP is an INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan. It doesn't matter how many students there are, it doesn't matter what other kids can or can't do and it doesn't matter what a teacher thinks a kid at that grade level "should" be able to do. If there is an accommodation listed in the IEP, the school is required BY LAW to honor the IEP. If the teacher can't manage it, it's on the school to figure out if he needs a 1:1 or some other means to have his needs met. If it's not on his IEP, and he is not able to do this on his own, it should be added to his IEP.

Believe me when I tell you that accommodations are not given easily and that there are underlying needs if a kid has an IEP. I would be questioning why this is only a problem for ONE teacher.



If it is not on the IEP that a teacher MUST email parents an assignment the teacher has the right not to do that. Doing favors just to be nice can come back to bite the teacher in the butt too you know.

Message edited 11/12/2015 10:08:35 PM.

Posted 11/12/15 10:02 PM
 

CallaLily
Thank you, Saint Gerard!

Member since 10/07

4937 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by StarsStripes

Posted by dpli

An IEP is an INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan. It doesn't matter how many students there are, it doesn't matter what other kids can or can't do and it doesn't matter what a teacher thinks a kid at that grade level "should" be able to do. If there is an accommodation listed in the IEP, the school is required BY LAW to honor the IEP. If the teacher can't manage it, it's on the school to figure out if he needs a 1:1 or some other means to have his needs met. If it's not on his IEP, and he is not able to do this on his own, it should be added to his IEP.

Believe me when I tell you that accommodations are not given easily and that there are underlying needs if a kid has an IEP. I would be questioning why this is only a problem for ONE teacher.



If it is not on the IEP that a teacher MUST email parents an assignment the teacher has the right not to do that. Doing favors just to be nice can come back to bite the teacher in the butt too you know.



I'm sorry, but I disagree with this. I have seen IEP accommodations being given out like candy. IMO, too many accommodations absolve the student of responsibility and of learning how to compensate for their disability. I don't think having the student write down a homework assignment in 8th grade is too much to ask. I think having the teacher sign the agenda book to say that the HW is properly copied is a good option as well.

Posted 11/12/15 10:40 PM
 

BargainMama
LIF Adult

Member since 5/09

14639 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by dpli

An IEP is an INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan. It doesn't matter how many students there are, it doesn't matter what other kids can or can't do and it doesn't matter what a teacher thinks a kid at that grade level "should" be able to do. If there is an accommodation listed in the IEP, the school is required BY LAW to honor the IEP. If the teacher can't manage it, it's on the school to figure out if he needs a 1:1 or some other means to have his needs met. If it's not on his IEP, and he is not able to do this on his own, it should be added to his IEP.

Believe me when I tell you that accommodations are not given easily and that there are underlying needs if a kid has an IEP. I would be questioning why this is only a problem for ONE teacher.



I agree, but unfortunately many teachers have the mentality that they shouldn't *have* to do it. I know quite a few teachers that have ranted about even having to follow an IEP for a student, and follow up on their goals, etc., and how inconvenient it was for them Chat Icon

Posted 11/13/15 12:14 PM
 

oldtimerocknroll
LIF Adult

Member since 11/14

1239 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

.

Message edited 11/28/2015 2:13:29 PM.

Posted 11/15/15 10:59 AM
 

lipglossjunky73
My Everything!

Member since 11/05

35670 total posts

Name:
<3

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by Mags1227

Posted by BargainMama

Posted by lakadema

I teach eighth grade math. I have to say this is unreasonable. The child is going to high school next year. I don't think I would honor this request as a teacher either for the following reason: if I happen to forget(amongst teaching my 100 students) to write down his hw for him or email you, is it then my fault he didn't do the hw? It's a slippery slope. I'm sure he has friends he can text in the teachers class and they can tell him the hw if he can't write it down himself. Also, an accommodation made for one child is not fair if I don't do it for everyone. I have plenty of students with ieps and 504s and they all manage to write down the hw everyday.



You don't have 100 students in ONE period though.

I'm saddened by some of these responses. If a kid needs help, they need HELP. Who cares if it's 1st grade, 8th grade, or 12th grade. Who cares if your 35 others students with an IEP don't need help writing it down? If ONE does, why deny that help?

Yes a child SHOULD be able to do that, but not ALL can (my son is in 11th and CAN'T). How about do everything you can to HELP make the child successful. If ALL of the other teachers are doing this for the child, they are obviously making it work. Why can't the one teacher do it? Just to be difficult. Sad.



i agree. i taught high school, and would go around and make sure EVERY student wrote down their hw before we even began the lesson. Also, since there is a parent portal, I see no reason for the teacher not to have homework up there so the parents know what their child has to do.

edited to say none of my students had an IEP (as far as i knew)



You would have known if your students had IEPs. It's illegal for teachers not to know if their students have IEPs.

Posted 11/16/15 7:28 AM
 

mommy2B3
2 boys 2 girls!!!!

Member since 7/08

3324 total posts

Name:
M

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by BargainMama

Posted by dpli

An IEP is an INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan. It doesn't matter how many students there are, it doesn't matter what other kids can or can't do and it doesn't matter what a teacher thinks a kid at that grade level "should" be able to do. If there is an accommodation listed in the IEP, the school is required BY LAW to honor the IEP. If the teacher can't manage it, it's on the school to figure out if he needs a 1:1 or some other means to have his needs met. If it's not on his IEP, and he is not able to do this on his own, it should be added to his IEP.

Believe me when I tell you that accommodations are not given easily and that there are underlying needs if a kid has an IEP. I would be questioning why this is only a problem for ONE teacher.



I agree, but unfortunately many teachers have the mentality that they shouldn't *have* to do it. I know quite a few teachers that have ranted about even having to follow an IEP for a student, and follow up on their goals, etc., and how inconvenient it was for them Chat Icon



This seriously broke my heart, and I hope my DS never comes across a teacher like this.

Personally I don't think it's asking too much, teachers jobs are to make sure their students are thriving. If this boy completes his homework when she writes it for him, I think she should accommodate him for the time being and start working with him until he feels confident to do it himself. It only takes one teacher to break a child's confidence and ruin their school experience, I wish those who aren't as flexible would understand that.

Posted 11/16/15 9:24 AM
 

jellybean78
:)

Member since 8/06

12738 total posts

Name:
Mommy

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by dpli

An IEP is an INDIVIDUALIZED Education Plan. It doesn't matter how many students there are, it doesn't matter what other kids can or can't do and it doesn't matter what a teacher thinks a kid at that grade level "should" be able to do. If there is an accommodation listed in the IEP, the school is required BY LAW to honor the IEP. If the teacher can't manage it, it's on the school to figure out if he needs a 1:1 or some other means to have his needs met. If it's not on his IEP, and he is not able to do this on his own, it should be added to his IEP.

Believe me when I tell you that accommodations are not given easily and that there are underlying needs if a kid has an IEP. I would be questioning why this is only a problem for ONE teacher.



Yep I agree 100%. The teacher should absolutely be giving the lessons to him.

And no, an IEP is not a get out of jail free pass but it is an accommodation given for valid reasons to certain students. That means that the teacher may very well have to do extra for that student with the IEP.

Posted 11/16/15 9:52 AM
 

chilltocam
LIF Adult

Member since 11/11

8020 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Thank you everyone for all of the replies. I appreciate all of the different perspectives. It seems like now the school is looking to increase his services, and hopefully that will help him. It just breaks my heart to see him struggle because I can see how it is hurting his self-confidence and causing more social issues.

Posted 11/16/15 10:01 AM
 

LisaI
Momma's Little Beans

Member since 1/06

3923 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Since he is IEP, they MUST provide whatever is needed to assist!

Posted 11/28/15 10:32 AM
 

oldtimerocknroll
LIF Adult

Member since 11/14

1239 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted 11/28/15 2:13 PM
 

jlwd
LIF Infant

Member since 2/09

118 total posts

Name:

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

I'm a teacher and I think it is crazy that the teacher said it's too much work....what?????? Especially if the child has an IEP. You must make modifications to help the student. If this teacher refuses I would be in the Principals office ASAP.

Posted 11/30/15 10:33 PM
 

sfp0701
Liam's Mommy!

Member since 1/07

9764 total posts

Name:
Tricia

Re: Is this asking too much of a teacher?

Posted by chilltocam

Posted by LSP2005

Does he have an iep? I would schedule a meeting with the guidance counselor or the vice principal to discuss how he is slipping through the cracks.



Yes he has an iep and the principal was at the meeting where the teacher refused to provide the assignments. They will be seeking further assistance, but it just seems ridiculous that the teacher, who knows he has problems, would refuse to help in a way that seems (at least to me - so maybe from a teacher's perspective there's more to it), a relatively minor way.


WHAT? He has an IEP and they refuse to do something so simple. It boggles my mind how little some teachers understand special needs.

Posted 12/1/15 6:54 AM
 
Pages: 1 [2]
 

Potentially Related Topics:

Topic Posted By Started Replies Forum
Asking for a change in teacher/class andreat 2/29/08 5 Teachers
Teen Charged With Vomiting On Teacher DebG 6/14/05 11 Families Helping Families ™
I am officially a Stste certified teacher!! YAY 04bride 6/6/05 15 Families Helping Families ™
Teacher resume question...repost from LIW. Cocoa 5/25/05 1 Families Helping Families ™
Teacher Interview questions that you have been asked Missy 5/18/05 0 Career
Graduation present for Gym Teacher??? julz33 5/17/05 5 Families Helping Families ™
 
Quick navigation:   
Currently 29292 users on the LIFamilies.com Chat
New Businesses
Carleton Hall of East Islip
J&A Building Services
LaraMae Health Coaching
Sonic Wellness
Julbaby Photography LLC
Ideal Uniforms
Teresa Geraghty Photography
Camelot Dream Homes
Long Island Wedding Boutique
MB Febus- Rodan & Fields
Camp Harbor
Market America-Shop.com
ACM Basement Waterproofing
Travel Tom
Yoga Womb/ SECS talk

      Follow LIWeddings on Facebook

      Follow LIFamilies on Twitter
Long Island Bridal Shows